Section

  • Introduction to this course

    The IP manager in a high-growth technology business (HTB) needs to be able to communicate between the company's general management, R&D and legal divisions. The IP strategy series gives a basic understanding of the management tools needed to perform an IP management role in a company and how to apply them to the strategic management of intellectual property assets. The focus is on value-based strategies for IP creation and IP value extraction as an integral part of the company 's innovation strategy. 

    In this course, you find three modules comprising each readings explaining the content, a recorded lecture and a quiz. In the last chapter, you find further resources complementing the training.

    You will have the possibility of obtaining a certificate, after having passed the quizzes with a total rate of at least 70%. You can repeat the quizzes as often as you want.

    If you want to take a quiz, you need to you register in the European Patent Academy’s e-learning centre with your account and enrol to this course.

    Please also read the curriculum of the whole series.

    • Module 1: IP strategy at the heart of business strategy

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      Main purposes of this module:

      • to put a clear focus on IP strategy as an integral part of corporate business strategy
      • to create awareness that the IP strategy and related IP management decisions significantly affect the performance of a business 
      • to convey a basic understanding of various IP strategy approaches as the basis for subsequent modules on IP creation strategies and IP value extraction strategies

      The topics covered in this module:

      i.       The economic impact of counterfeiting and piracy
      ii.      IP at the heart of corporate strategy – gaining ownership in innovation
      iii.     Overview of common IP asset types - codified and uncodified IP
      iv.     IP maturity levels - from protection to IP based business
      v.      IP manager profiles in different maturity levels of the IP strategy

      Read more about this module:

      This module starts with some statistics on the economic damage caused by illegal counterfeiting and piracy, illustrating one example of the economic motivation for IP rights and their relevance to globalised economies and mass production, when the cost of copying is lower than the cost to invent and to innovate.

      It also explains the importance of owning an innovation for successful commercialisation and sets out the links between technology strategy, product/market strategies and IP strategy with the aim of protecting the relevant IP assets to gain ownership of your innovation. It illustrates the two IP exploitation paths: protecting the primary value chain for premium price strategy vs. generating additional income from licensing.

      A powerful IP strategy typically uses a mix of codified IP (patents, trade-marks, designs, copyrights etc.) and uncodified IP (know-how about technology, implementation, products etc.) to maximise the protection of the business. Finally, it presents the different stages of maturity of the strategy and the accompanying evolution of the IP management roles.


    • Module 2: IP value-extraction strategies

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      Main purposes of this module:

      • to introduce value extraction strategies 
      • to explain how IP assets can be used to improve competitive position and/or income generation
      • to provide an example for each IP value extraction model

      Topics to be covered:

      i.     Value chains
      ii.    Premium price supported by IP 
      iii.   Entrepreneurial use of IP for financing 
      vi.   Revenue generation with IP assets 
      v.    Technology access and FTO 
      vi.   Market opportunities through Open innovation and collaboration 
      vii.  IP based control of ecosystems

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      First the different value chains within a company are explained. Subsequently six different value extraction models are analysed.

      The first model is based on the protection of primary value chain aspects in which exclusivity is pursued with a view to gaining market dominance for the protected features, which allows premium prices to be enforced. 

      IP assets can also generate value through use in entrepreneurial activities, whether in the context of a start-up (attracting investors, licensing agreements, exit negotiations) or by large enterprises (spin-offs, acquiring small companies in search of disruptive technologies).

      Research institutes or universities may typically generate revenue from licensing agreements, acting as a licensor. This model also applies to large enterprises as a secondary income stream and NPE's as a first stream. Franchising models are revenue generation models based on trade mark licensing.

      In industries with cumulative complex technologies (e.g. ICT) a major value of IP lies in the improved negotiating power to gain access to the IP portfolios of third parties through cross-licensing.

      Open innovation (OI) and collaboration (e.g. in publicly funded projects) require a clear IP strategy and rules from the start regarding the ownership of IP brought into the project and being created during the project.

      The value of IP can also be based on the ability to control access to a technology platform, e.g. the Android trade mark registered by Google.

    • Module 3: Innovation environments and influencing factors

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      Main purposes of this module:

      • to establish a link between the innovation activity of a company and how the patent system can provide useful inputs for future innovation 
      • to motivate participants to look deeper into specific innovation processes and tools as presented in later modules

      Topics to be covered:

      i.    What is innovation? Concept of ideality
      ii.   Drivers and environments encouraging innovation
      iii.  Why innovation fails
      iv.  The role of management

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      By giving a definition of "innovation" and explaining its requirements, forms, stages and types, it is then possible to explore the drivers and environments that can either stimulate or discourage innovation and the role of management therein.

      On the basis of the model of the seven C's, various triggers for encouraging innovation are discussed. Reasons for failure are explored on the basis of internal and external factors. The management of a company or organisation plays a key role in these processes.